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SIPS Constitution

Brief summary of responsibilities

Strategic Planning

  • Director: Direct and coordinate strategic planning for the School
  • Section Chair: Lead strategic planning for Section in the context of the School plan

New faculty hiring

  • Director: Oversee faculty hiring priorities among Sections and submit faculty hiring requests to the Dean
  • Section Chair: Lead faculty hiring prioritization for the Section in the context of the School strategic plan

New faculty mentoring

  • Director: Review faculty mentoring process
  • Section Chairs: Conduct mentorship and review of faculty

Faculty Tenure/Promotion

  • Director: Provide tenure and promotion recommendations to Dean
  • Section Chairs: Manage tenure and promotion, provide recommendations to the Director

Teaching and TAs

  • Director: Coordination of TA assignment process
  • Section Chairs: Make teaching assignments among faculty and TAs

Budget & space assignments

  • Director: Oversight of fiscal management for the School
  • Section Chairs: Fiscal management of section budget & space assignments

Graduate Fields: Application requirements, Field requirements

  • Changes to Graduate Field policy are decided by votes of Graduate Field members. Votes are typically called by the Field DGS
  • Section chairs and SIPS Director: can vote within the Fields of which they are members

New Initiatives

  • Ideas for initiatives and committees within the school are brought to the Executive Committee for discussion prior to their formation

Structure Documentation

School of Integrative Plant Science in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences

Executive Summary

In the coming decades, the world must arrive at solutions to the major challenges of feeding a burgeoning population, mitigating and adapting to climate change, and preserving biodiversity and essential ecosystem functions. Plants underpin all agricultural and natural ecosystems and environmental impacts on plant  systems will cascade at local, regional, national, and international scales. But plants will also be the basis for solutions. Innovative approaches and revolutionary breakthroughs in plant sciences will be used to  meet these challenges and help secure a sustainable future for coming generations.

Cornell scientists are at the crux of research leading to those solutions. Faculty across the plant science disciplines are engaged in laboratory and field work, teaching and mentoring, as well as community outreach to translate the academic gains into real-world action.

For more than a century, Cornell University has been among the best in the world at developing multifaceted teams to address some of the world's biggest challenges. That legacy of achievement continues. In response to these emerging and increasingly urgent needs, Cornell University’s College of Agriculture and Life Sciences is establishing the School of Integrative Plant Science. The School will be structured in a way that allows for the disciplines composing the School to maximize their creativity in the context of a coordinating structure that will create and promote a whole new class of innovative interactions, in addition to creating a high level.

of visibility for the plant sciences at Cornell. The principal goals of creating The School of Integrative Plant Science are to coordinate strategic planning and faculty hiring in the plant sciences and thereby  allow  strength and innovation in areas of key importance in research, teaching and extension and to grow the undergraduate major. The School will foster effective responses to the major challenges facing humanity by:

  • Developing and maintaining prominent high impact research and extension programs in the plant sciences;
  • Training scientists, food producers, educators policy makers and citizens will be capable of addressing these challenges;
  • Increasing the visibility of the plant sciences in ways that attract more undergraduate majors to careers in the plant sciences;
  • Engaging in effective extension and outreach programs to address immediate and emerging issues state, national and international levels.

1 - Why a School of Plant Science?

Feeding a future world with 9 billion inhabitants, providing bioenergy to help power that world, preserving biological diversity and essential ecosystem functions in that world, creating environments that promote human well-being, and realizing medical and manufacturing opportunities afforded through a better understanding of natural products are all founded in plant science. Meeting these challenges is core to the mission of the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences. This mission is to:

  • Advance knowledge of the unity and diversity of life;
  • Develop agricultural systems to establish and maintain safe, nutritious food supplies for current future generations;
  • Promote wise stewardship of the environment and natural resources and creating economical, sustainable energy strategies;
  • Foster economic vitality and individual and community health and well-being, and;
  • Impart to students a world-class education and passion for life-long learning and discovery.

Plant science will provide the foundation for solving many of the current and future problems facing  humanity. But to do so, much research and education is required, and the plant sciences at Cornell must be strategically poised to make these contributions. A larger and more prosperous human population will put unprecedented demands on our food system. Indeed, it is thought that food production will need to double world-wide to meet future needs. This increasing demand coupled with the impacts of climate change will require advanced crop development that takes full advantage of modern genomics, bioinformatics, synthetic biology and systems biology. Management systems must be devised that realize the potential of these new technologies. While increasing the yield of agriculture is essential, it is also critical to simultaneously reduce the environmental impacts of agriculture. In addition to the best breeding programs, we must also develop better agronomic practices including soil and water management, planting systems and the ability to predict how plants will function under a variety of environmental and management conditions. Plants must be protected from pests in safe and sustainable ways. We need to understand how plants can contribute to

meeting energy needs and how plants can be used to ameliorate global warming. Humans depend on the services that plants and agriculture provide. These include ecosystem services such as  maintenance  of  habitat for wildlife, pollinators and soil microorganisms, provisioning of food and fiber, climate stabilization, and cultural and recreational opportunities. Plants and the soils upon which they grow are the foundation for all ecosystems and hence play a pivotal role in the services ecosystems provide. Plants produce a wide range of biologically active chemicals; while some have been put to use for man’s benefit, possible uses for the vast majority of these compounds have not been studied. Assemblages of plants, either natural, managed or constructed, are appreciated for the beauty and recreational opportunities they provide. Thus, there are clear and compelling reasons for increasing our understanding of plants and associated organisms and soils, and for making use of this knowledge to improve managed systems, sustain natural systems and enhance human well- being.

While plant science is more important today than ever before, this significance is not broadly recognized in society and it will take major efforts through public outreach, education, and media engagement to change these perceptions. Bright, energetic, entrepreneurial young people will be needed to solve the grand challenges of food security, sustainable energy, climate change, and biodiversity loss, and doing so requires that a significant number of these young people will need to focus on plant science and its application.

Plant sciences in CALS must be strong for the college to meet its commitment of sustainable improvement in the lives of people in New York, the nation, and the world. This strength is threatened for three interconnected reasons. First, plant science faculty are closer to retirement age than other faculty in CALS. The implication of this is that in the absence of new faculty hires, capacity will be lost as these faculty retire. New plant science faculty will be hired in CALS; however, over the next several years the faculty replacement rate will not match the rate at which faculty retire. Therefore, faculty must be replaced in a strategic and coordinated manner by considering the needs for the plant sciences as a whole and not solely the needs of a particular plant science discipline.

Second, over the last several years, the financial model for higher education has come to rely less on public support with a corresponding greater reliance on tuition revenue. There is increased use of responsibility- centered management budgeting which prescribes how revenues are shared among units, associates revenues directly with revenue-creating activity, and assigns costs to activities that generate the costs. Currently, the plant sciences rely somewhat more heavily than other disciplines on public support. In part, this is because the plant sciences are heavily involved in extension activity by which research findings and applied technologies are brought to target audiences for the public good. Also, in part due to their extension responsibilities, plant science faculty have generally taught fewer students per faculty member than other sectors of the college. Recent initiatives have begun increasing student numbers in plant science classrooms, and the proposed reorganization plan introduces additional steps toward increasing student numbers. Nonetheless, at present, the revenue from tuition and available public support does not provide sufficient resources to support for existing plant science faculty and associated programs. With the shift to responsibility-centered budgeting, strategic planning and coordination across the plant sciences is essential. A third constraint is the public’s limited realization of the importance of plant science in ensuring food security, ecosystem sustainability, contribution as a foundational resource for the world’s agricultural and biological processes, and as a means by which new scientific knowledge can be applied for economic prosperity. Students and the public tend to overlook plant science and view medicine and certain other fields as having greater opportunities. Indeed, the actual importance of plant science for humanity versus the relative importance it now receives is a great paradox. This perception gap may narrow in the future but this will require academic institutions to initiate organizational changes that amplify the impacts and visibility of the plant sciences to a wide range of people.

To strategically position plant science in CALS, we propose the creation of the School of Integrative Plant Science. The principal goals of the School will be to coordinate strategic planning and faculty hiring in the  plant sciences and thereby allow strength and innovation in areas of key importance in research, teaching and extension and to grow the undergraduate major. The School of Integrative Plant Science will provide a visible entity to match the College’s investment in the plant sciences. One aim of the school will be to track societal and scientific needs going forward and to innovate and lead in these contexts. The School will promote synergies due to structured interactions and juxtapositions that follow from the School organization. Specific goals will be to:

  • Convey the strategic importance of the plant sciences and their critical role in solving several of most pressing problems facing humanity including providing a safe and secure food supply, mitigating the impacts of climate change, developing sustainable energy supplies, developing sustainable water and nutrient management practices, and preserving biodiversity and concomitant ecosystem services.
  • Enhance existing and forge new linkages with other programs in CALS and throughout the University.
  • Coordinate strategic planning and faculty hiring among plant science disciplines.
  • Sustain and enhance research excellence in the plant sciences.
  • Increase the number of undergraduate students in the Plant Science major by continuing to develop the plant sciences curriculum and associated student support services.
  • Better coordinate graduate student support across plant science fields.
  • Enhance the alignment of extension activities with research strengths.
  • Coordinate administrative support services to better develop expertise in support staff and allow for more dynamic allocation of support effort to match needs.

We envision the School of Integrative Plant Science to be a cohesive, collaborative community of scholars, educators, staff and students who strive to be the preeminent source of plant science research, who work towards meeting food security, energy, biodiversity, and technological innovation needs, and who provide exceptional educational opportunities for students and citizen clients.

3  - The Structure of the School of Plant Science

The School and its leadership structure

The School of Integrative Plant Science (SIPS) will be composed of five Sections based on the five existing plant science departments. The proposed names for these sections are Crop and Soil Sciences, Horticulture, Plant Breeding and Genetics, Plant Systems Biology and Plant Pathology and Plant-Microbe Biology. Each Section will have a Section Chair.

The School of Integrative Plant Science will have a Director and a Director of Undergraduate Studies (DUS). There will also be four standing committees in the School: the Executive Committee (EC), the Faculty Renewal Committee (FRC), the Committee for Promotion and Tenure (CPT) and the Undergraduate Committee on Teaching and Learning (CTL). In addition to the standing committees, Extension Leaders from each Section and Directors of Graduate Studies in the school will constitute councils that will meet to coordinate activities and advise the Director on needs and opportunities.

The School of Integrative Plant Science will have a budget derived from the budget of each section that will be used to support School functions. A proposed budget model is provided later in this report.

A model for assigning responsibilities to support staff and for mentoring and supervising these individuals will be developed by the Director and Executive Committee using two broad principles: Support staff responsibilities should be structured to encourage development of experts who can meet the needs of faculty throughout the school. Support staff should have a client base with whom they develop relationships and good understanding of needs.

School Administrative Leadership Model/Rationale

The School will be led by a Director and the Sections will be led by Section Chairs. The responsibilities at these two levels of administration are summarized in Table 1 and further elucidated below where the authority/responsibilities of the Sections vs. those of the School and the relationship between the two are laid out. In addition to defining the roles of Director and Section Chairs, the key aspects of this relationship and the implications for the responsibilities accruing to their separate administrations are provided.

Directorship, Appointment Procedure

The Director will be appointed by the Dean for a term of three to five years. If the Director is appointed from within the existing faculty, it is recommended that successive Directors be selected from different Sections so that there is no real or perceived lock on the Directorship by a particular discipline. The Director should be counseled by the Executive Committee, which the Director will chair. The Director should not simultaneously serve as a Section Chair.

Director’s Duties and Responsibilities

The Director’s primary functions, with advice from the Executive Committee, can be divided in three categories: Strategy, Education/Extension and Management and include the following specifics:

  • To lead building consensus among the units through the relationship with the Executive Committee; to represent the and opinions of the units to one another and to administration;and,when and where appropriate, to speak with one voice representing the School.
  • To lead the coordinated strategic planning for the School and its component sections
  • To appoint Chairs of Standing Committees (other than the Executive Committee which the Director Chairs).
  • To appoint and supervise the Director of Undergraduate Studies in consultation with the Executive Committee.
  • To supervise undergraduate programs and coordination of TA assignments through her/his interactions the Director of Undergraduate Studies and the Undergraduate Committee on Teaching and Learning, and to coordinate with section chairs the faculty-member contributions interdisciplinary undergraduate programs.
  • To work with the Council of Section Extension Leaders (former DEL’s) and extension leadership in the
    college to coordinate extension services and resources.
  • To, in collaboration with the Executive Committee and Council of Directors of Graduate Studies, manage the School relationship with relevant Graduate Fields.
  • To step aside (by recusing herself/himself) when possible conflicts of interest arise concerning decisions relating to her/his home section as might occur in promotion and tenure decisions, certain situations regarding resource allocation etc. The Director should be advised by the Executive Committee as to when it might be appropriate to do so.
  • There will be added efficiencies in office support staff associated with the School structure—the Director will work with senior administrative staff and Section Chairs to identify an appropriate administrative support structure and supervision and mentoring system.

Table 1. Comparison of responsibilities of the School Director and Section Chairs

School Director

Section Chair

Direct and coordinate strategic planning for the School

Lead strategic planning for Section in the context of the School plan

Oversee faculty hiring priorities among Sections  and submit faculty hiring requests to the Dean

Lead faculty hiring prioritization for the Section in the context of the School strategic plan

 

Review faculty mentoring

Mentor/review faculty

Provide tenure and promotion  recommendations to Dean

Manage tenure and promotion, recommend section representatives for the CPT to the Director, provide tenure/promotion recommendations to the Director and under certain circumstances to the Dean

 

   

Supervise undergraduate program, coordinate TA assignments

Manage teaching assignments among faculty and teaching assistants

Coordinate extension programming by working with Section extension leaders and CCE Directors

Identify Section extension leaders

Oversee supervision and allocation of support staff

Supervise locally-sited support staff

Represent School at administrative meetings

Represent Section in administrative meetings

Responsible for overall fiscal management and leadership of the School including budget and facility allocations

Responsible for fiscal management of the section and operational execution of section budget and space assignments

Committee Composition and Function:

The Executive Committee (EC) will be chaired by the Director and composed  of the  five  Section Chairs and, of two ex officio members, the Director of Undergraduate Studies and the chair of the Council of Extension Leaders. The Executive Committee will be consulted by and advise the Director in matters  pertaining to School function including but not limited to strategic planning, resource allocation, administrative staff assignments, disposition of new position recommendations and curriculum changes.

The Faculty Renewal Committee (FRC) will function de facto as a structural element critical to implementing School strategic planning by making recommendations for filling new professorial positions to the Executive Committee.  It will be comprised of two faculty from each section and the Director will appoint  a chair.

The Committee for Promotion and Tenure (CPT) will serve as an advisory committee to objectively review dossiers for a high level of readiness. The CPT and/or CPT chair will review all reappointment, promotion and tenure dossiers and provide a recommendation to the appropriate Section’s faculty. The committee will be composed of two representative tenured faculty members from each section in the School. Members of the committee will be appointed by the Director in consultation with section chairs and the Senior Associate Dean of CALS. Terms for CPT members will initially be for 2 or 3 years to stagger replacement of members. Subsequent appointments will be made for 3 year terms.

The Undergraduate Committee for Teaching and Learning (CTL) will consist of faculty from the Sections and function in managing the curriculum in a dynamic fashion appropriate to serving the needs of students as they pursue well-defined career  pathways  in  the  plant  sciences,  and  in  advising  the Director of Undergraduate Studies (DUS) who will chair the committee and report to the School Director.

The Council of Directors of Graduate Studies (DGS) will consist of the DGS’s of each graduate field that is in the School. The Director will appoint a chair for the council. The council will work to assure that the graduate fields in the school recruit the best students and that these students are well trained and mentored to prepare them for their chosen careers.

The Council of Extension Leaders (CEL) will advise the Director on activities and initiatives that the School should undertake to sustain or improve extension and outreach programming. It will be comprised of section extension leaders and one representative from each of the extension program work teams that play  significant roles in the extension programming conducted by School faculty. The Director will appoint the chair of the CEL.

Section Structure and Administrative Leadership Model/Rationale

Each Section will be composed of a Section Chair (and Associate Chair where applicable), faculty  and  academic staff from the corresponding existing departments. The Sections will also include such  administrative support personnel as recommended by a committee charged with determining the ideal administrative staff support structure for the School and its Sections.

Faculty members who (for compelling reasons) feel that they would be better aligned with another Section, will have an opportunity to change to the Section they feel most appropriately fits their research, teaching and extension interests. These requests will require approval by the Dean who will consult with the Director and relevant Section Chairs.

Section Chair Responsibilities and Functions

Section Chairs have two broad sets of responsibilities, to provide leadership for the faculty and staff in their section and to integrate section activities and strategic planning with the School. More specifically, the responsibilities of the Section Chair are:

  • To lead strategic planning for the Section within the context of the School strategic plan
  • To lead faculty hiring prioritization from the Section in the context of the School strategic plan.
  • To mentor and review faculty according to procedures implemented by the College and School and to cultivate the Sectional professional identity and tenure home.
  • To manage tenure and promotion, to recommend section representatives to the School CPT, and to provide promotion and tenure recommendations to the School Director and, under certain circumstances, to the Dean.
  • To make teaching assignments within the Section in accordance with the overall needs of the School.
  • To represent the Section at college administrative meetings, including the Chairs’ meetings with the Dean pending review after the 2014/2015 academic year.
  • To administer the budget for the Section.
  • To manage a subset of TA lines and Section specific endowments.
  • To supervise and conduct performance evaluations on appropriate administrative support staff.
  • To manage space allocated to the Section and regularly discuss space needs with the Director
  • To manage space allocated to the Section and regularly discuss space needs with the Director.
  • To manage, in appropriate Sections, faculty teaching assignments related to the undergraduate major in
    Biological Sciences and to maintain a good working relationship with the Director of the Office of
    Undergraduate Biology (OUB) in order to manage the interests of the sections in the Biological
    Sciences Major.
  • To supervise college funded extension associates and lecturers

4  - Curriculum, Undergraduate Recruitment & Mentoring and Advising, TA assignment and course  management

Director of Undergraduate Studies

A successful and vibrant plant science major will require strong leadership and robust administrative support, similar to that of other thriving majors in the college. The leadership of the major will consist of a Director of Undergraduate Studies (DUS) with broad responsibilities for recruitment, curriculum development, retention, advising and internships. The DUS will report directly to the Director on matters related to the responsibilities described below. The DUS will chair the Committee for Undergraduate Teaching and Learning (CTL) and will be vested with sufficient authority to make decisions regarding the Plant Science major. Strategic decisions or actions are to be discussed and evaluated by the CTL and the Executive Committee. For the DUS to be successful, s/he will also require the assistance of a Student Services Associate II  (SSA)  appointed  by the  Director, similar to the model used for other multidisciplinary majors. The DUS will be  provided  a  small  budget  by  the Director to assist with travel, facilitation of meetings,  and other  costs  associated with management of  the major.

Given the critical leadership role that School faculty and sections play in several other undergraduate majors beyond the Plant Science major, the Director of the School should ensure that Sections continue to fulfill their roles in providing leadership and contributions for all of the undergraduate programs that they serve. In addition to the Plant Science major, faculty in the School currently have leadership roles in undergraduate programs in Agricultural Sciences, International Agriculture and Rural Development, and Viticulture and Enology. Furthermore, Faculty in the School make significant teaching and advising contributions to several other undergraduate majors including Agricultural  Sciences,  Environmental  Sciences  and  Sustainability,  Science of Earth Systems, Biological Sciences, and Viticulture and Enology. In recognition of the importance of these contributions and to ensure that teaching needs beyond the plant science major continue to be met, the Director should meet regularly with the DUS for each of these majors, and work with appropriate Section Chairs to provide support for these programs.

In the list below, while the Student Services Associate II (SSA) will be supervised by the DUS, the roles of the DUS and SSA have not been separated since a specific division of tasks will be arranged between the two. Regardless of the division of labor, some high level duties will be the responsibility of the SSA, so this position will require more skills than an administrative assistant position would provide.

The specific roles of the DUS, supported where appropriate by the SSA, and in a reporting relationship with the Director of the School will be:

  • Continually review and revise learning outcomes with the Committee for Undergraduate Teaching and Learning. Work with Section Chairs to ensure that critical courses are offered to allow learning outcomes and concentrations to be achieved.
  • Develop assessments of learning outcomes and ensure that students have met the requirements graduation in the major.
  • Lead the CTL in annual review of the assessments to determine students’ success in achieving the learning outcomes for the major. Based on the assessment review, determine revisions (if any) need to be made to the curriculum. Submit an annual report of the assessment review to the CALS Associate Dean and Director of Academic Programs.
  • Together with appropriate Section Chairs, oversee peer review of teaching. Ensure that courses are peer-reviewed regularly; every second year for courses offered yearly or every other time they offered for courses delivered on an alternating year schedule.
  • Manage course names, numbers, and room assignments when possible.
  • Ensure that all undergraduate plant science courses (4000 level and below) are listed in one l
  • Inform the Director of facility needs in teaching.
  • Together the CTLO, work with faculty to improve teaching methods. Provide a forum for sharing and discussing teaching methods within the School. Encourage faculty to attend workshops related to teaching.
  • Develop and implement a plan for recruitment, both internally and externally, using various targeted media (web site, brochure, Facebook, etc.) and personal contact with promising candidates (e.g. Cornell Days, drop-in visitors, school visits, plant science ambassadors).
  • Cultivate a relationship with CALS Admissions and provide input on the type of applicants freshmen and transfers) desired by the major, and work with CALS administration to optimize admission targets.
  • Develop an orientation program for incoming freshmen and transfer students. Ensure that these students receive special attention their first semester at Cornell.
  • Conduct exit interviews with graduating seniors.
  • Recruit advisors and oversee the assignment of advisors. Provide training for advisors. Ensure consistency of advising. Build a pool of specific advisors for specific concentrations and transfer students.
  • Provide back-up advising when faculty are travelling.
  • Cultivate relationships with CALS Career Development to enhance relationships with potential
    employers, community colleges and SUNY schools. Determine characteristics and experiences desired of
    graduates and ensure that these are incorporated into the learning outcomes
  • Identify opportunities for student internships and research. Provide general oversight of internship programs.
  • Receive, manage and approve student petitions.
  • Identify opportunities for student internships and research. Provide general oversight of internship
    programs.
  • Receive, manage and approve student petitions.
  • Explore the possibility of offering various minors through the School.
  • Keep track of data on applications, admissions, and employment after graduation.
  • Plan, coordinate and implement events around graduation for all plant science majors.
  • Communicate with other DUSs in related majors (Ag Science, VIEN, IARD) and minors to coordinate
  • teaching functions and avoid conflicts in scheduling. Explore options for broader gateways into the
  • college.
  • Communicate regularly with the school director regarding matters of teaching and learning

Faculty in the School make significant teaching contributions to several other undergraduate majors including Agricultural Sciences, Environmental Sciences and Sustainability, Science of Earth Systems, Biological Sciences, International Agriculture and Rural Development, and Viticulture and Enology. In recognition of the importance of these contributions and to ensure that teaching needs beyond the plant science major continue to be met, the Director should meet regularly with the DUS for each of these majors.

Graduate student support and teaching responsibilities

Teaching assistantships (TAs) provided from the college to the School and sections serve two  critical  functions: i) support for classroom teaching and ii) support for graduate programs. The desired number of TAs is far greater than what is available; hence, a mechanism needs to be established to optimize this resource while maintaining a broad portfolio of graduate student opportunities.

Graduate field support: Units are currently assigned a number of TA lines and these are used to support the appropriate graduate fields. Units use these lines, together with grants, endowments, fellowships and assistantships in other units to create support packages for accepted students. Specific strategies have been developed within each unit and fine-tuned over time, so under the reorganization, support for a field will remain with the unit most closely affiliated with that field.

The School will receive TA allocations from the college based on teaching metrics and priorities established by the college and recommendations of the Office of Academic Programs. Allocations within the School will be assigned by the Director following consultation with the Executive Committee and Directors of Graduate Studies. Consideration will be given to each Section so that graduate programs in respective fields can be supported and sustained. The goal will be to help fields avoid large or rapid fluctuations in numbers of lines. Therefore, the Director, Executive Committee, and Directors of Graduate Studies will meet every three years to evaluate the allocation of TA lines to respective sections. If a shift is deemed necessary, then a plan will be developed to shift the resource at an appropriate time and at an appropriate rate.

Teaching support: All students supported on TA lines will be required to teach, together with those on teaching-dedicated endowments and those required to teach as part of their degree program. A list of anticipated teaching-eligible students will be provided to the Director and Director of Undergraduate Studies each June and updated in November. A parallel process will be established to identify classes that desire a TA, and data will be assembled relating to historical student numbers, type of class, and faculty expectations for TAs in that class. The School Director and the Director of Undergraduate Studies will develop a plan for TA assignments in conjunction with the Executive Committee, and in consultation with the instructors, that optimizes the use of TAs in the classroom. All students on TA lines will be available to assist in any class within the plant sciences, regardless of which section/field supports the student. The plan will be revealed as soon as possible before the start of each semester so that faculty and students can plan accordingly.

Recruiting: Each Graduate Field approaches graduate student recruiting differently. One of the responsibilities of the Director will be to examine each field’s approach to recruitment and determine if there can be efficiencies gained by advertising together and/or hosting together. Given the large diversity in the types of students applying and desired by faculty, it is perhaps not possible  to design  one  approach for  accepting students  into the different plant science fields. However, at a minimum, the Directors of Graduate Studies (DGS’s) together with the Director, should determine if the process is matching applicants with the most appropriate field, and consider strategies to improve the pool of applicants.

5  - Administrative Support (Structure/management/development)

Administrative support will be designed for the School. This will be accomplished by commissioning an ad hoc committee to be chaired by senior Department Business Managers who are familiar with the current plant science departments. The following capacities/functions should be maintained while optimizing the spatial disposition and reporting relationships of employees:

• Business manager
• Financial reporting
• Pre proposal preparation
• Director and Section Chair assistants
• Assistant to Director of Undergraduate Studies
• Graduate Field Assistant (GFA)
• Standing Committee support
• Website support
• Seminar/Event support
• General Section support

Background: The ad hoc committee will be asked to design an administrative support staffing structure, its deployment, and reporting relationships for the new School of Integrative Plant Science. The School will be structured in a way that allows for each of the sections composing the School to function in a way that maximizes creativity in effectively carrying out the missions associated with each of the sections, but in the context of a coordinating structure that will create and promote a whole new class of innovative interactions, in addition to creating a high level of visibility for the plant sciences at Cornell.

Constraints and Principles: The number of administrative support staff will be in alignment with college-wide metrics for administrative support. The disposition of support personnel is evolving with shared personnel having been successfully implemented at a number of levels including business manager, pre-proposal preparation and events coordinator. It has been possible to accomplish this increase in efficiency because of a generally higher level of staff expertise and because specialization has made effective shared positions possible. We expect these two factors to play an important role in the design of administrative support in the School.

We also recognize that the disposition of support personnel has been driven to some extent by historical factors rather than completely implemented by algorithms based on department activities. We expect that such algorithms might be applied in designing an optimal model for School and Sections staff support.  However,  we add that any changes or redeployments of personnel that might follow from such analyses  should be made in a fashion that is as non-disruptive to the Sections experiencing such changes as possible. We expect spatial relationships (staff distributions) to be maintained as appropriate to the need for personal contact between service providers and clients. And, congruent with that goal, we expect reporting relationships to be logically based on the spatial relationships (proximity) among supporting personnel and the administrations of the School and its Sections.

6  - Extension Programs

Extension programming within the five sections in the proposed School of Integrative Plant Science would be coordinated and overseen by the Council of Extension Leaders (CEL). The CEL will be composed of  SELs (section extension leaders) from each of the sections with active extension programming. Also the CEL will include one member from each Program Work Team (PWT) that is closely aligned programmatically with one or more of the sections. A primary function of the CEL is to effectively communicate and coordinate extension programming across the sections such that more efficient and integrated programming is achieved, and to serve as a communication link with the School Director and the Director and Associate Director of Cornell Cooperative Extension. The Director will appoint a chair from amongst the SELs who will serve a term of 3-5 years with possibility of re-appointment. Each PWT will specify the duration of the appointment for their representative on the CEL. A section extension leader may also serve in the role of PWT representative if need be, but this is not encouraged. The CEL chair will sit as an ex-officio on the Executive Committee of the School of Integrative Plant Science and will use these meetings to inform and update the Executive Committee and Director of the School on extension related issues. The Chair of the CEL as well as section extension leaders will also actively represent the overall interests and concerns of section members and Program Work Teams  to Cornell Cooperative Extension (CCE) Directors.

This organizational structure will facilitate:

  • Evaluation of the current mix of Program Work Teams in the plant sciences, consideration of new PWTs, and restructuring and realignment of PWTs to increase coordination and stakeholder impact.
  • Professional development opportunities across the various section extension programs and PWTs.
  • Coordination of inter-section extension-related conferences and workshops via the use of an events coordinator.
  • Use of effective and consistent assessment approaches for enhancing extension programs across the sections and PWTs.
  • Increased integration of undergraduate student opportunities within extension programming.
  • Development and coordination of relevant and timely press releases in line with faculty extension expertise from each of the sections.
  • Exploration of ways to develop and enhance relevant partnerships between university-based research, extension and outreach faculty, and to expand faculty involvement in extension.

7  - Facilities Management

The current Departments of Crop and Soil Sciences, Horticulture, Plant Biology, Plant Breeding and Genetics, and Plant Pathology and Plant-Microbe Biology occupy office and lab space in several buildings on both the Geneva and Ithaca campuses. Additional personnel are housed in satellite facilities across the state. The teaching, research, and extension programs in these departments rely heavily on extensive field, greenhouse, and growth chamber facilities managed by the Cornell University Agricultural Experiment Station and the New York State Agricultural Experiment Station. The operation (utilities) and maintenance of these facilities is expensive and under new university financial models, those costs are budgeted as College expenses. The size, scope, and maintenance of these facilities must be sized to match faculty needs and available financial resources. It will be critical that future facilities upgrades, space consolidations, and closure of research farm facilities be conducted after careful strategic planning and evaluation by faculty and CALS facilities staff.

Under the School of Integrative Plant Science, space that is under the direct management of the current departments will continue to be managed by the Section Chairs, as will facilities managed by the Experiment Station Directors. However, in order to ensure coordinated, efficient and strategic facilities management, planning, and optimum space allocations, the Section Chairs will regularly advise and consult with  the  Director of the School on space allocation decisions. For example, when space or facilities are required for new faculty hires or expanded instructional needs, there should be a coordinated discussion of the best physical location for that program or class within the space managed by the Sections. The Director in concert with the Chair of the relevant Section, will liaison with the Directors of the two Experiment Stations and CALS Facilities personnel to provide the most efficient and coordinated use, operation and maintenance of existing facilities with

the long-term aim of maintaining the best possible building and equipment resources needed to support our programs, while simultaneously reducing the total footprint in use and cost of facilities operation and maintenance.

8  - Budget

The Director of the School has overall budgetary responsibility. Currently the college distributes resources to the sections in three categories:

1. Formula-based operating funds: These are funds provided to academic departments based on the
number of faculty and academic staff in a department.
2. Instruction, research and extension support: These are based on historical agreements made between
the college and departments for financial support and are not formula based.
3. Indirect cost (IDC)s: 8% of indirect costs generated by faculty in a department are currently returned to
the department. The University has adopted a policy that provides for 2% of collected IDC to be
returned to the investigator provided the IDC rate is ≥ 25%. This 2% is included in the 8% returned to
departments

The Director will work with the Executive Committee to develop a unified budget that supports activities in sections and activities centered in the School.

The Director of the School will have financial resources that can be used to support new initiatives or existing programs and activities that she/he deem to have strategic importance. The resources will initially be 5% of the resources allocated to the sections by the college. The Director working with the Executive Committee will review this allocation and determine whether 5% of the total budget is appropriate. The Director should always have some discretionary resources.

Process Documentation School of Integrative Plant Science

College of Agriculture and Life Sciences

Committee composition and function:

The Executive Committee (EC) will be chaired by the Director and composed of the five Section Chairs and, of two ex officio members, the Director of Undergraduate Studies and the chair of the Council of Extension Leaders. The Executive Committee will be consulted by and advise the Director in matters pertaining to School function including but not limited to strategic planning, resource allocation, administrative staff assignments, disposition of new position recommendations and curriculum changes.

The Faculty Renewal Committee (FRC) will function de facto as a structural element critical to implementing School strategic planning by making recommendations for filling new professorial positions to the Executive Committee. It will be comprised of two faculty from each section and the Director will appoint a chair.

The Committee for Promotion and Tenure (CPT) will serve as an advisory committee to objectively review dossiers for a high level of readiness. The CPT and/or CPT chair will review all reappointment, promotion and tenure dossiers and provide a recommendation to the appropriate Section’s faculty. The committee will be composed of two representative tenured faculty members from each section in the School. Members of the committee will be appointed by the  Director in consultation  with section chairs and the Senior Associate Dean of CALS. Terms for CPT members will initially be for 2 or 3 years to stagger replacement of members.

Subsequent appointments will be made for 3 year terms.

The Undergraduate Committee for Teaching and Learning (CTL) will consist of faculty from the Sections and function in managing the curriculum in a dynamic fashion appropriate to serving the needs of students  as they pursue well-defined career pathways in the plant sciences, and in advising the Director of Undergraduate Studies (DUS) who will chair the committee and report to the School Director.

The Council of Directors of Graduate Studies (DGS) will consist of the DGS’s of each graduate field that is in the School. The Director will appoint a chair for the council. The council will work to assure that the graduate fields in the school recruit the best students and that these students  are well trained and mentored to prepare them for their chosen careers.

The Council of Extension Leaders (CEL) will advise the Director on activities and initiatives that the School should undertake to sustain or improve extension and outreach programming. It will be comprised of section extension leaders and one representative from each of the extension program work teams that play significant roles in the extension programming conducted by School faculty. The Director will appoint the chair of the CEL.

Faculty hiring

A goal in creating the School of Integrative Plant Science is to coordinate and integrate strategic planning and faculty hiring in the plant sciences. The Director, in consort with the Executive Committee, will identify a process for developing and regularly updating the strategic plan for the School. An iterative process should be developed whereby the strategic plan for the School is informed by strategic planning by the sections and the sections in turn modify their plans in response to the School strategic plan. A major outcome of strategic planning is identification of faculty hiring needs. Sections will respond to the School strategic plan and their own disciplinary faculty needs and propose new faculty positions.

These positions will be prioritized by the School using the following process: Faculty position proposals will be reviewed and ultimately ranked by the Faculty Renewal Committee. This committee will be composed of ten faculty representing broad programmatic themes found among the sections. There will be two representatives from each section consisting of one senior tenure-track faculty member of outstanding stature and one junior tenure track faculty member, each appointed by the section chair, with consideration given to a section’s strategic plan (mission) regarding disciplines addressed, academic responsibilities, constituencies served, and a distribution across campuses and university holdings. The Director will appoint the chair of the Faculty Renewal Committee (FRC). Members of the committee will serve for three years with initial appointments made so that there is staggered replacement of committee members. The intent is for the committee members to serve the broad interests of the plant sciences and not to exclusively advocate for their sections.

Review will occur via a two-stage process. Sections will initially formulate position requests based on  the School strategic plan and submit these to the FRC for review. The FRC will review the suite of position requests and provide feedback to the requesting sections on how their requests  could be improved or better coordinated with other requests. Sections will revise position requests based on feedback provided by the FRC and submit formal position requests to the Director. The FRC will review and rank these requests and provide recommendations with justifications to the Director who will then submit position requests to the Dean. The FRC will make use of the following criteria for ranking position requests.

  • When a position request follows a failed nomination for tenure, the position will be refilled. However, the Section has an opportunity to, in consultation with (or under the guidance of) the Committee, to determine precisely how the position should be filled.
  • In case more searches for a specific (e.g., suitable candidate), subject re-evaluation Committee; search will
  • Position requests should be made in accordance with the college’s mission as well as the Section (included in the request package) and School strategic plans in light of position requests, departures and appointments in the last 10 years.
  • Consideration for maintaining an appropriate across campuses and expertise reflected in Section and strategic plans.
  • Strategic plans a list probable hiring facilitate planning immediate review
  • Position requests should have an appropriate balance of education (classroom or extension) and research responsibilities; neither research nor education should be an overriding consideration with lackluster attention paid to the complementary part of the position.
  • Teaching responsibilities identified and linked established anticipated curricular Priority given filling deficiencies in core curricula. Evidence provided a teaching need met existing faculty members (adjunct, courtesy faculty).
  • Extension articulated a and their identified.
  • The research program have and a vision for faculty success.
  • Consideration given a role in advancing diversifying scientific expertise in plant sciences. include facilitate development a scientific discipline achieve scientific prominence within existing
  • When useful, small clusters of hires in particular subject areas that potentially span sections (including departments outside plant sciences) should be considered.

The Faculty Renewal Committee will also be involved in the selection of search committees. The Committee will approve section search committees and at least one member of the FRC will serve on the search committee.

Faculty mentoring/promotion & tenure/promotion to professor

Faculty mentoring, tenure and promotion, and promotion to professor will be a shared responsibility of the School of Integrative Plant Science and the Sections. The processes underlying reappointment to assistant professor, promotion to associate professor with tenure, and promotion to full professor are distinct and are described separately, beginning with the first step.

Reappointment to Assistant Professor

The SIPS Director and the Chair of the Committee on Promotion and Tenure (CPT) will review dossiers and provide a statement to the Section Chair prior to the section discussing the document. This will enable concerns (if any) to be transmitted by the relevant Section Chair for specific consideration by the Section faculty.

Following discussion and voting by the Section faculty, the Section Chair provides a recommendation to the SIPS Director, who, in consultation with the CPT Chair, makes a recommendation to the Senior Associate Dean. This procedure is intended to provide efficient participation of School leadership in the reappointment process and serves as a prelude to the more extensive engagement of the Section faculty and the School faculty (via the CPT) in the tenure and promotion review process.

The procedure and timeline for reappointment of assistant professors is summarized in Figure 1.

 

Reappointment Process for Assistant Professors

SIPS Timeline

Begin process 9 months before CALS deadline which is 3 months before reappointment date

SIPS Process

Deadline before due to Senior Associates Dean’s office

Section Chair works with candidate to prepare dossier.

6 months

CPT chair reviews dossier and provides a recommendation to Section Chair.

2 ½ months

Section tenured faculty review dossier and vote.

8 weeks

Section Chair provides a recommendation to the School Director.

4 weeks

School Director, in consultation with CPT chair, provides a recommendation to the Dean.

2 weeks

 

Figure 1. Reappointment process for assistant professors.

Section Chairs will manage preparation of the dossier by working with the candidate to develop the necessary data and documents.

The CPT Chair will review the dossier, in the current state of completion and in accordance with the timeline in Figure 1, and provide a statement to the Section Chair prior to the section discussing the document. If the CPT Chair is in the same section as the candidate being considered for reappointment, another member from outside the candidate’s section will review the dossier.

Upon receipt of the statement from the CPT Chair, tenured faculty in the section will review and discuss the case and convey to the Section Chair their vote.

The Section Chair will convey, via a letter, a recommendation to the Director. The Section Chair’s letter will become part of the dossier.

The School Director, in consultation with CPT chair, will provide a letter to the Dean on whether the candidate should be reappointed. The School Director’s letter will become part of the dossier.

In cases where there is disagreement between the Section Chair’s recommendation and the Director’s recommendation, the Section Chair should meet with the Director to discuss the basis for the conflicting opinions. If, after having done so, the Section Chair still opposes the Director’s recommendation, the Section Chair should summarize her/his arguments in a letter to the Dean with a copy to the Director. The Dean should include this correspondence with the dossier as it goes to the ad hoc committee. This is more or less an appeals process, but one that accesses the Deans, preserving the integrity of the sections in appropriate balance with the School, and correctly gives the impression that both sides of the argument will be fairly represented throughout the remaining process.

The standard appeals process for faculty members begins if the Director does not recommend tenure to the Dean. Administrative Guidelines

See Figure 1 above for dossier review procedure and timeline.

Promotion to Associate Professor with Tenure

The goal of the tenure and promotion review process is to promote excellence across all of the plant sciences. The process incorporates the recognition that management of mentoring and preparation of the tenure review dossier are best done by knowledgeable colleagues within the Section. The process is summarized in Fig. 2.

Tenure and Promotion Process for Assistant Professors

SIPS Timeline

Begin 6 months before CALS deadline

Section Chair works with candidate to prepare dossier. The Section Chair solicits suggestions for external reviewers from CPT and Section faculty.

 

6 months

CPT reviews dossier and provides a recommendation to Section tenured faculty.

2 ½ months

Section tenured faculty review dossier and vote. Letters from faculty conveying votes and rationale sent to Section Chair.

1 ½ months

Section Chair provides a recommendation to the School Director.

4 weeks

School Director provides a recommendation to the Dean.

2 weeks

 

CALS Deadline

April 1

August 1

October 1

December 1

SIPS Timeline

Begin

Deadline

Begin

Deadline

Begin

Deadline

Begin

Deadline

Section Chair works with candidate to prepare dossier. The Section Chair solicits suggestions for external reviewers from CPT and Section faculty.

 

 

Oct 1

 

 

Jan 15

 

 

Feb 1

 

 

May 15

 

 

Apr 1

 

 

July 15

 

 

June 1

 

 

Sept 15

CPT reviews dossier and provides a recommendation to Section tenured faculty.

 

Jan 15

 

Feb 1

 

May 15

 

June 1

 

July 15

 

Aug 1

 

Sept 15

 

Oct 1

Section tenured faculty review dossier and vote. Letters from faculty conveying votes and rationale sent to Section Chair.

 

Feb 1

 

Mar 1

 

June 1

 

July 1

 

Aug 1

 

Sept 1

 

Oct 1

 

Nov 1

Section Chair provides a recommendation to the School Director.

 

Mar 1

 

Mar 15

 

July 1

 

July 15

 

Sept 1

 

Sept 15

 

Nov 1

 

Nov 15

School Director provides a recommendation to the Dean.

Mar 15

Apr 1

July 15

Aug 1

Sept 15

Oct 1

Nov 15

Dec 1

Figure 2. Tenure and promotion review process for assistant professor

A standing CPT committee as defined prior will participate in the review process.

Section Chairs will manage preparation of the dossier by working with the candidate to develop the necessary data and documents and by soliciting external reviews. Section faculty and the CPT will be consulted for suggestions of external reviewers.

The CPT will review the dossier, in the current state of completion and in accordance with the timeline in Figure 2. The CPT chair will provide a written recommendation to the tenured faculty of the section that conveys the opinion(s) of the committee. If there are divergent opinions, both perspectives should be presented with the majority perspective identified.

Upon receipt of the recommendation from the CPT, tenured faculty in the section will review and discuss the dossier and provide individual letters to the Section Chair that convey vote and rational.

Following receipt of letters from tenured faculty, the Section Chair will convey, via a letter, a recommendation to the Director. The Section Chair’s letter will become part of the dossier.

The Director of the School will prepare a letter to the Dean on whether the candidate should be awarded tenure and promotion. The School Director’s letter will become part of the dossier.

In cases where there is disagreement between the Section Chair’s recommendation and the Director’s recommendation, the Section Chair should meet with the Director to discuss the basis for the conflicting opinions. If, after having done so, the Section Chair still opposes the Director’s recommendation, the Section Chair should summarize her/his arguments in a letter to the Dean with a copy  to the Director. The  Dean should include this correspondence with the dossier as it goes to the ad hoc committee. This is more or less an appeals process, but one that accesses the Deans, preserving the integrity of the sections inappropriate balance with the School, and correctly gives the impression that both sides of the argument will be fairly represented throughout the remaining process.

The standard appeals process for faculty members begins if the Director does not recommend tenure to the Dean.

Administrative Guidelines

See Figure 2 above for dossier review procedure and timeline. Tenure Home

Faculty are affiliated with specific Sections although faculty are tenured in the School. If tenure is denied, a position in the affiliated Section where the failed tenure occurred will receive the highest priority in the coordinated hiring process.

Promotion to Full Professor

The CPT will have a role in promotions to full professor and the process will be more streamlined in comparison to the role in evaluating promotions awarding tenure. For promotion to professor, the CPT will follow the process described in Figure 3.

 

Promotion Process to Full Professor

SIPS Timeline

Begin 6 months before CALS deadline

Section Chair checks with CPT Chair and School Director to assess readiness and timing of proposed promotion.

6 months

Section Chair works with candidate to develop dossier and with Section senior faculty and CPT Chair (who may consult with CPT members, as needed) to identify appropriate outside reviewers.

5 ½ months

Section senior faculty review dossier and vote. Letters from faculty conveying votes and rationale sent to Section Chair.

1 ½ months

Section Chair writes a recommendation to the School Director.

4 weeks

School Director, in consultation with CPT Chair, provides a recommendation to the Dean that specifically addresses the candidate’s eminence and impact in the context of the School.

 

2 weeks

CALS Deadline

July 1

February 1

SIPS Timeline

Begin

Deadline

Begin

Deadline

Section Chair checks with CPT Chair and School

Director to assess readiness and timing of proposed promotion.

 

Jan 1

 

Jan 15

 

Aug 1

 

Aug 15

Section Chair works with candidate to develop dossier and with Section senior faculty and CPT Chair (who may consult with CPT members, as needed) to identify appropriate outside reviewers.

 

Jan 15

 

May 1

 

Aug 15

 

Dec 1

Section senior faculty review dossier and vote. Letters from faculty conveying votes and rationale are sent to Section Chair.

 

May 1

 

Jun 1

 

Dec 1

 

Jan 1

Section Chair writes a recommendation to the School Director.

Jun 1

Jun 15

Jan 1

Jan 15

School Director, in consultation with CPT Chair, provides a recommendation to the Dean that specifically addresses the candidate’s eminence and impact in the context of the School.

 

Jun 15

 

Jul 1

 

Jan 15

 

Feb 1

 

Figure 3. Process for promotion to full professor in the School of Integrative Plant Science. A standing CPT committee as defined prior will participate in the review process.

The Section Chair, CPT Chair and the School Director will assess readiness and timing of the proposed promotion.

Section Chairs will manage preparation of the dossier by working with the candidate to develop the necessary data and documents and by soliciting external reviews and consult with section faculty and the CPT Chair (who may consult with CPT members, as needed) to identify appropriate reviewers.

Section tenured faculty will review the complete dossier and provide individual letters to the Section Chair that convey vote and rational.

Following receipt of letters from tenured faculty, the Section Chair will convey, via a letter, a recommendation to the Director. The Section Chair’s letter will become part of the dossier.

The Director of the School, in consultation with the CPT Chair will prepare a letter to the Dean on whether the candidate should be promoted to full professor. The School Director’s letter will become part of the dossier.

In cases where there is disagreement between the Section Chair’s recommendation and the Director’s recommendation, the Section Chair should meet with the Director to discuss the basis for the conflicting opinions. If, after having done so, the Section Chair still opposes the Director’s recommendation, the Section Chair should summarize her/his arguments in a letter to the Dean with a copy to the Director. The Dean should include this correspondence with the dossier as it goes to the ad hoc committee. This is more or less an appeals process, but one that accesses the Deans, preserving the integrity of the sections in appropriate balance with the School, and correctly gives the impression that both sides of the argument will be fairly represented throughout the remaining process.

The standard appeals process for faculty members begins if the Director does not recommend tenure to the Dean.

Administrative Guidelines

See Figure 3 above for dossier review procedure and timeline. Tenure Home Faculty are affiliated with specific Sections although faculty are tenured in the School. If tenure is denied, a position in the affiliated Section where the failed tenure occurred will receive the highest priority in the coordinated hiring process.

Phased Involvement of CPT in Promotion Processes

The CPT’s involvement in promotions to tenure, as summarized in Figure 2, will begin with any untenured faculty that are hired after the founding of the School, 6 June 2014.

The CPT ’involvement in promotions to full professor, summarized in Figure 3, will be phased into use as current associate professors in the School become eligible for further promotion.

Tenure Process for faculty hired as Associate Professor with tenure received from another institution

This process will follow the guidelines for promotion to full professor.

Tenure process for faculty hired as Associate Professor without tenure

This process will follow the guidelines for promotion to associate professor with tenure. Must submit dossier within 5 years of their hire for tenure to be considered.

Reappointment/Promotion of Lecturers, Research Associates and Extension Associates

Administrative Guidelines

See Appendix A for dossier review procedure and timeline.

Appendix A

 

Reappointment Process for Lecturers

SIPS Timeline

Begin process 6 months before CALS deadline which is 2 months before reappointment date

SIPS Process

Deadline before due to Senior Associates Dean’s office

Section Chair works with candidate to prepare dossier.

6 months

Section Chair provides a recommendation to the Dean (cc: Director).

2 weeks

 

Reappointment Process for Senior Lecturers

SIPS Timeline

Begin process 6 months before CALS deadline which is 2 months before reappointment date

SIPS Process

Deadline before due to Senior Associates Dean’s office

Section Chair works with candidate to prepare dossier. (10-year anniversaries only - Section Chair solicits suggestions for external reviewers from CPT and Section faculty.)

 

6 months

CPT reviews dossier and provides a recommendation to Section Chair.

2 ½ months

Section Chair provides a recommendation to the School Director.

4 weeks

School Director provides a recommendation to the Dean.

2 weeks

 

 

Promotion Process for Lecturers

SIPS Timeline

Begin process 6 months before CALS deadline which is 2 months before reappointment date

SIPS Process

Deadline before due to Senior Associates Dean’s office

Section Chair checks with CPT Chair and School Director to assess readiness and timing of proposed promotion.

6 months

Section Chair works with candidate to develop dossier.

5 ½ months

Section senior faculty review dossier and vote.

1 ½ months

Section Chair writes a recommendation to the School Director.

4 weeks

School Director, in consultation with CPT Chair, provides a recommendation to the Dean that specifically addresses the candidate’s eminence and impact in the context of the School.

 

2 weeks

 

Reappointment Process for Extension Associates and Research Associates

SIPS Timeline

Begin process 6 months before CALS

deadline which is 2 months before reappointment date

SIPS Process

Deadline before due to Senior Associates Dean’s office

Section Chair works with candidate to prepare dossier.

6 months

Section Chair provides a recommendation to the Dean (cc: Director).

4 weeks

Reappointment Process for Senior Extension Associates and Senior Research Associates

SIPS Timeline

Begin process 6 months before CALS deadline which is 2 months before

reappointment date

SIPS Process

Deadline before due to Senior Associates Dean’s office

Section Chair works with candidate to prepare dossier. (Only on 10-year anniversaries - Section Chair solicits suggestions for external reviewers from CPT and Section faculty.)

 

6 months

CPT reviews dossier and provides a recommendation to

Section Chair.

2 ½ months

Section Chair provides a recommendation to the School Director.

4 weeks

School Director provides a recommendation to the Dean.

2 weeks

 

 

Promotion Process for

Extension Associates and Research Associates

SIPS Timeline

Begin process 6 months before CALS deadline which is 2 months before reappointment date

SIPS Process

Deadline before due to Senior Associates Dean’s office

Section Chair checks with CPT Chair and School Director to assess readiness and timing of proposed promotion.

6 months

Section Chair works with candidate to prepare dossier. The Section Chair solicits suggestions for external reviewers from CPT and Section faculty.

 

5 ½ months

Section senior faculty review dossier and vote.

1 ½ months

Section Chair writes a recommendation to the School Director.

4 weeks

School Director, in consultation with SPT Chair, provides a recommendation to the Dean that specifically addresses the candidate’s eminence and impact in the context of the School.

 

2 weeks