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Science-based solutions for a changing world

In the coming decades, the world must arrive at solutions to the major challenges of feeding a burgeoning population, mitigating and adapting to climate change, and preserving biodiversity and essential ecosystem functions. Plants underpin all agricultural and natural ecosystems and environmental impacts on plant systems will cascade at local, regional, national, and international scales. But plants will also be the basis for solutions.  Our vision is to to help secure a sustainable future for coming generations.

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bus in the snow

Heroic efforts make “Snowcruitment 2020” a success

Feb 12, 2020

Recruitment events for the five SIPS graduate fields were underway when Winter Storm Kade arrived Feb 7, bringing up to 13 inches of ice and snow to Ithaca. Thanks to the heroic efforts of many, alternative arrangements were made and prospective students departed, impressed by the can-do spirit and enthusiastic attitudes of SIPS students, staff and faculty.

Onion growers have new tool versus fungicide-resistant disease

Feb 6, 2020

Five years ago, New York State onion growers started reporting large incidents of premature leaf death in their fields. It affected nearly 75% of growers’ crops and put a dent in the state’s onion industry.  SIPS researchers Sarah Pethybridge and Frank Hay have identified the culprit as Stemphylium leaf blight (SLB), a relatively new and increasingly devastating disease.

Expert panel on innovating food value chains convenes at Cornell

Feb 6, 2020

Cornell Atkinson Center food security working group, in collaboration with the journal Nature Sustainability is convening a year long expert panel on ‘Innovations to build sustainable, equitable, inclusive food value chains.’ SIPS affiliated faculty Rebecca Nelson and Ed Buckler are among the 22 recognized experts from around the world who will identify scientific, institutional, behavioral, policy, and other obstacles to be overcome.

Lost in translation: Organic matter cuts plant-microbe links

Jan 30, 2020

Johannes Lehmann's program together with soil scientists at Rice University have dug around and found that although adding carbon organic matter to agricultural fields is usually advantageous, it may muddle the beneficial underground communication between legume plants and microorganisms.

Victoria lily flowers in the new Liberty Hyde Bailey Conservatory

The Victoria lily (Victoria x ‘Longwood Hybrid’) in the water garden of the Liberty Hyde Bailey Conservatory has been flowering profusely since the Labor Day Holiday weekend. We were able to catch its first spectacular two-day flowering in the Conservatory in this time-lapse video. Learn more about this fascinating plant.